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Storm Water Management Program

Resources

To Report a Spill - Call the Spill Hotline:
Daytime: 8:00am to 5:00pm - call 425.295.0500
After Hours: call King County 24-Hour dispatch at 206.296.8100

 

Upcoming Events

 

Does your car drip? Ever wondered if a ‘spot’ on the ground came from your car? Want to learn how to properly maintain your car?

Join the experts at participating Certified Automotive Training Centers at a location near you for a FREE Auto Leaks workshop - a $125 value. Open to everyone in Puget Sound. At this workshop you’ll:

  • Get a free professional inspection from a certified automotive instructor.
  • Learn how to identify and prevent leaks.
  • Receive tips on repairing minor common leaks.
  • Learn preventive maintenance.
  • Leave the class with a FREE Vehicle Maintenance Check Kit and the confidence to talk to your mechanic.

Watch our video and hear what past participants have to say: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fEy1oTedzho

Workshop Locations:

  • Renton Technical College: Saturdays, 1 pm – 5 pm
  • South Seattle Community College: Saturdays, 9 am – 1 pm
  • West Seattle High School Automotive Center: Saturdays, 9 am – 1 pm
  • Shoreline Community College: Coming Soon!

One hour in class session and you are in the shop for the rest of the time.

Here is a one-minute promo video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qnRJDnvRxAA to share with friends and family.

Hurry now! Space is limited. To register go to: www.fixcarleaks.org

These free workshops are brought to you by the Department of Ecology and Seattle Public Utilities.
 

Frequently Asked Questions

What is polluted runoff?

Water from rain and melting snow either seeps into the ground or “runs off” to lower areas, making its way into streams, lakes and other water bodies. On its way, runoff water can pick up and carry many substances that pollute water.

Some - like pesticides, fertilizers, oil and soap – are harmful in any quantity. Others – like sediment from construction, bare soil, or agricultural land, or pet waste, grass clippings and leaves – can harm creeks, rivers and lakes in sufficient quantities.

In addition to rain and snowmelt, various human activities like watering, car washing, and malfunctioning septic tank can also put water onto the land surface. Here, it can also create runoff that carries pollutants to creeks, rivers and lakes.

Polluted runoff generally happens anywhere people use or alter the land. For example, in developed areas, none of the water that falls on hard surfaces like roofs, driveways, parking lots or roads can seep into the ground. These impervious surfaces create large amounts of runoff that picks up pollutants. The runoff flows from gutters and storm drains to streams. Runoff not only pollutes' but erodes streambanks. The mix of pollution and eroded dirt muddies the water and causes problems downstream.

What is Nonpoint Source Pollution?

This is another term for polluted runoff and other sources of water pollution that are hard to pinpoint. The term “nonpoint source pollution” comes from the federal Clean Water Act of 1987. There, it is used as a catch-all for all kinds of water pollution that are not well-defined discharges (point sources) from wastewater plants or industries.

What causes polluted stormwater runoff?

Polluted stormwater runoff generally happens anywhere people use or alter the land. People going about their daily lives are the number one source of stormwater pollutants. Most people are unaware of how they impact water quality. Some common examples include over fertilizing lawns, excessive pesticide use, not picking up pet waste, using salt or fertilizer to de-ice driveways, letting oil drip out of their vehicles and littering. Developed areas in general, with their increased runoff, concentrated numbers of people and animals, construction and other activities, are a major contributor to NPS pollution, as are agricultural activities. Other contributors include forest harvesting activities, roadways, and malfunctioning septic systems.

Why do we need to manage stormwater and polluted runoff?

Polluted stormwater runoff is the number one cause of water pollution in Washington. In most cases in today, stormwater either does not receive any treatment before it enters our waterways or is inadequately treated.

Polluted water creates numerous costs to the public and to wildlife. As the saying goes, “we all live downstream.” Communities that use surface water for their drinking supply must pay much more to clean up polluted water than clean water.

Polluted water hurts the wildlife in creeks, streams, rivers and lakes. Dirt from erosion, also called sediment, covers up fish habitats and fertilizers can cause too much algae to grow, which also hurts wildlife by using up the oxygen they need to survive. Soaps hurt fish gills and fish skin, and other chemicals damage plants and animals when they enter the water.

The quantity of stormwater is also a problem. When stormwater falls on hard surfaces like roads, roofs, driveways and parking lots, it cannot seep into the ground, so it runs off to lower areas. To give you an idea of the difference a hard surface makes, consider the difference between one inch of rain falling onto a meadow and a parking lot. The parking lot sheds 16 times the amount of water that a meadow does!

Because more water runs off hard surfaces, developed areas can experience local flooding. The high volume of water also causes streams banks to erode and washes the wildlife that live there downstream.

How are stormwater and runoff “managed”?

“Best management practices” is a term used to describe different ways to keep pollutants out of runoff and to slow down high volumes of runoff.

Preventing pollution from entering water is much more affordable than cleaning polluted water! Educating state residents about how to prevent pollution from entering waterways is one best management practice. Laws that require people and businesses involved in earth disturbing activities --like construction and agriculture -- to take steps to prevent erosion are another way to prevent stormwater pollution. There are also laws about litter, cleaning up after pets and dumping oil or other substances into storm drains.

Education and laws are just two best management practice examples. Some BMPs are constructed to protect a certain area. Some are designed to slow down stormwater, others help reduce the pollutants already in it – there are also BMPs that do both of these things.

Detention ponds, built to temporarily hold water so it drains away slowly, fill up quickly after a rainstorm and allow solids like sediment and litter to settle at the pond bottom. Then, they release the water slowly. These ponds are one constructed BMP example. Green roofs, storm drain grates, filter strips, sediment fences and permeable paving are other examples.

Why all the recent fuss about stormwater?

The federal Clean Water Act requires large and medium sized towns across the United States to take steps to reduce polluted stormwater runoff. The law was applied in two phases. The first phase addressed large cities. The second phase, often referred to as ”Phase II,” requires medium and small cities, fast growing cities and those located near sensitive waters to take steps to reduce stormwater. In Washington state, Phase II laws took effect in 2005.

These laws require cities to do five things:

1)

Conduct outreach and education about polluted stormwater runoff.

2)

Provide opportunities for residents to participate and be involved in conversations and activities related to reducing polluted stormwater runoff.

3)

Detect illicit discharges (e.g. straight piping or dumping).

4)

Control construction site runoff.

5)

Operations and Maintenance of post-construction Stormwater Facilities.

If it only affects streams and creeks, why should I care?

Streams and creeks feed into rivers, lakes and the ocean. We all drink water, so we are all affected when our water is polluted. When water treatment costs rise, the price of drinking water goes up. If you like to fish, swim or boat, you may have heard or been affected by advisories warning you not to swim, fish or boat in a certain area because of unhealthy water or too much algae. Shellfish like clams and oysters cannot be harvested from polluted waters, so anyone that enjoys these foods or makes a living from the shellfish industry is affected. Money made from tourism and water recreation can also be impacted, as are businesses and home flooded by stormwater runoff. When we pollute our water, everyone is affected!

What can I do to reduce the amount of stormwater pollution I contribute?

If you own a car, maintain it so it does not leak oil or other fluids. Be sure to wash it on the grass or at a car wash so the dirt and soap do not flow down the driveway and into the nearest storm drain.  Better yet, wash your car at a commercial car wash, where the wash water is recycled and eventually flows to a waste water treatment plant.

If you own a yard, do not over fertilize your grass. Never apply fertilizers or pesticides before a heavy rain. If fertilizer falls onto driveways or sidewalks, sweep it up instead of hosing it away. Mulch leaves and grass clippings and place leaves in the yard at the curb, not in the street. Doing this keeps leaves out of the gutter, where they can wash into the nearest storm drain. Turn your gutter downspouts away from hard surfaces, seed bare spots in your yard to avoid erosion and consider building a rain garden in low-lying areas of your lawn

If you have a septic system, maintain it properly by having it pumped every three to five years. If it is an older system, be sure it can still handle the volume placed on it today. Never put chemicals down septic systems, they can harm the system and seep into the groundwater.

Pet owners should pick up after their pets and dispose of pet waste in the garbage.

Keep lawn and household chemicals tightly sealed and in a place where rain cannot reach them. Dispose of old or unwanted chemicals at household hazardous waste collections sites or events.

Never put anything in a storm drain.

Don’t litter.

How else can I help reduce stormwater pollution in my area?

Participate in the next stream or beach cleanup in your area. Storm drain marking events – where the destination of storm water is clearly marked on the drain – are a fun way to let your neighbors know the storm drain is only for rain. Attend public hearings or meetings on the topic so you can express your concerns. Report stormwater violations when you spot them to your local government (425-295-0500)  or keep learning about polluted stormwater runoff and tell a friend!

 

What is NPDES?

NPDES Phase II Municipal Stormwater Permit Program


The NPDES Phase II Municipal Stormwater Permit for Western Washington was issued by the Department of Ecology in January of 2007 and went into effect in February.  The permit requires that all affected municipalities create and implement a Stormwater Management Program (SWMPR) which addresses five required program elements: 

    1) Public Education and Outreach
    2) Public Involvement and Participation
    3) Illicit Discharge Detection and Elimination
    4) Construction Site Run-Off
    5) Operations and Maintenance of Post Construction Stormwater Facilities. 

While the Permit went into effect in February of 2007, the permit itself phases program implementation requirements out over the next four years.

What is NPDES?

The National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) is a federal permit that regulates stormwater and wastewater discharges to waters of the State.  While it is a federal permit, the regulatory authority has been passed to Washington State Department of Ecology (DOE).

What is Stormwater?

Stormwater - It's not just rainwater turned loose.

Stormwater is generally rain and melting snow that runs off surfaces that cannot readily absorb water. These surfaces include rooftops, pavement, compacted gravel lots, and even frozen ground. As it flows towards receiving waters such as streams, lakes, rivers or infiltrates down into the aquifer it picks up pollutants. These pollutants are such things as sediments, airborne dust, pet waste, oil, grease, fertilizers, chemicals, litter and whatever else we have left on the ground or poured down our drains and grates that can be carried or dissolved in water. Stormwater pollution is caused by all of us. Some of it can be treated. Most of it must simply be prevented.

What are stormwater problems?

Stormwater runoff causes pollution, erosion and flooding problems. These problems occur because we altered the land and changed the way that water moves through the landscape.

What causes flooding problems?

As Sammamish grows and we build more rooftops, driveways, streets and other hard or impervious surfaces, the land’s capacity to soak up and carry away excess water decreases. As a result, conditions that might result in a flood once every 100 years in an undeveloped area can cause flooding every four or five years after development has covered the land with impervious surfaces.

What causes pollution problems?

As water from rain and melting snow runs across these hard surfaces and over lawns and gardens they pick up pollutants such as sediments, pet waste, oil, grease, pesticides, and fertilizers. Stormwater carries these contaminants to our streams, rivers, lakes, wetlands and our aquifer. More and dirtier stormwater runs off each year, but we have fewer and fewer options to deal with it. Since individual contributions to stormwater are small, it is hard to believe that we really impact the quality and quantity of stormwater entering our water systems. The cumulative and long-term effects have a substantial impact to the health of our waterways.

What can be done about the problems?

Fortunately, something can be done to keep stormwater flooding and pollution problems from becoming worse.
We can:

1. manage stormwater to control flooding and erosion;
2. plan and construct stormwater systems so contaminants are removed before they pollute our surface waters or our groundwater resources, acquire and protect natural waterways where they still exist or can be rehabilitated;
3. look for opportunities to build "soft" structures such as ponds, swales or wetlands to work with existing or "hard" structures, such as pipes and concrete channels;
4. revise current stormwater regulations to address our comprehensive stormwater needs;
5. enhance and enforce existing ordinances to make sure property owners consider the effects of stormwater before, during and after development of their land;
6. educate ourselves about how our actions affect the quality of our water, and about what we can do to improve water quality; and
7. plan carefully to create solutions before problems become too great.

What's being done now?

WATERSHED PLANNING
We are taking a detailed look at each watershed to determine the best way to handle stormwater from existing and future development. Watershed plans will enable us to make better choices about how to plan, maintain, and construct our drainage systems so they can better meet the community’s many needs.

MAINTENANCE
We are improving the way we maintain ponds, swales, catch basins, drywells, ditches and culverts. We are mapping the location of each stormwater facility, monitoring their condition and tracking the time it takes to maintain them. This will help us determine which ones are working well, which ones aren’t and which ones we need to replace immediately to save money.

RESPONDING TO QUESTIONS/COMPLAINTS
When you have a stormwater concern in your neighborhood, call the stormwater utility to find out what can be done. We use your calls to help us determine which facilities need to be replaced or repaired, call 425.295.0500 or email Stormwater Management Team     

PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT AND AWARENESS
We are informing the public about drainage systems, how they function and how to take care of them. This will help reduce threats to water quality and prevent flooding problems.

Acknowledging growing concerns with stormwater in our daily lives, we have completed the Stormwater Management Program (SWMPR) document  and the current Western WA Phase II Permit Annual Report. Both documents will be updated annually to address additional phased permit requirements as they come into effect.  Please submit your comments to Stormwater Management Team  or address written comments to: City of Sammamish Public Works, Sr Stormwater Program Engineer,  801 228th Ave SE, Sammamish WA 98075.

Our overall goal for the program is not only to meet the requirements of the municipal stormwater permit administereed by the Department of Ecology, but also to ensure that our program addresses your concerns. Sammamish Public Works staff have been working with other jurisdictions around the Puget Sound through several regional forums in a collaborative effort to share resources, tools, and methodologies to meet Ecology’s SWMPR requirements. While the SWMPR will be updated and expanded every year through 2012, this document will primarily include descriptions of our existing programs and our plan to update these programs to meet the requirements of the Permit.

The City Of Sammamish Would Like Your Participation

We need your help in developing and implementing this program for the City. Opportunities for you to participate include attending public hearings, working as a citizen volunteer to educate other individuals about the program, assisting in program coordination with other pre-existing programs, or participating in volunteer monitoring efforts. Please contact the Stormwater Management Team.